Lidocaine cream for premature ejaculation

A quick guide to how Lidocaine and Prilocaine Cream can improve ejaculation timing

How lidocaine and prilocaine cream works

Premature ejaculation is a common problem in the male population, with nearly 30 percent of men reporting problems with controlling and holding back ejaculation for as long as they’ want to. Doctors typically regard an ejaculation as premature if it happens against the man’s will and in under one minute of vaginal intercourse.   

 

Given how often premature ejaculation occurs, pharmaceutical companies offer a vast array of options for treatment, which if successful will delay ejaculation to at least about 5-6 minutes, which is considered the average intercourse time for most couples.

 

Next to pills like sertraline and other SSRI anti-depressants, topical anesthetics are a popular choice. Whether as a cream, spray, or gel, they give the penis a numbing sensation when applied directly to the skin. This reduces its sensitivity and thus makes it last longer through sexual intercourse. It’s similar to the effect of wearing of thick condom during sex, which of course also is an option to desensitize the penis.  

 

Lidocaine and prilocaine are the most popular choice in the U.S. market and often come combined in one cream, which is available on prescription. Well-known branded versions are EMLA Cream, which was first approved by the U.S. FDA in 1992, and Ametop, but they are also available as generic drugs. Prilocaine can also be had on its own as an over-the-counter (OTC) drug, but it’s not as powerful as the combination creams.

 

How does lidocaine for premature ejaculation work?

The two anesthetics originally weren’t designed for treating premature ejaculation, but this “off-label” use came about in the early 2000s after small clinical trials showed that their use could delay ejaculation by several minutes. One 2004 study with 42 men recorded an improvement from 1.5 minutes to 8.5 minutes in intercourse ejaculation time after two months of use a lidocaine/prilocaine combination cream.  

 

The Lidocaine cream (same for the sprays and gels) normally is applied 5-10 minutes ahead of sexual intercourse directly on the penis. This will give it enough time for a numbing effect to set in and reduce penile sensitivity. Make sure to fully wash off the cream before having sex, or otherwise your partner may feel an unpleasant numbing sensation during intercourse. 

 

Such skin irritations, either to yourself or your partner, are the most common side effect of lidocaine cream. If used frequently, lidocaine cream may also have a long-term side effect of making the penis or other affected body parts insensitive to touch. Speak to a doctor to learn more about lidocaine’s adverse effects and its proper use for treating premature ejaculation. 

 

Where can I buy lidocaine & prilocaine cream?

Any normal pharmacy will carry this cream, but keep in mind that it’s only available on prescription. So, you’ll need a doctor to prescribe it first. Licensed internet pharmacies are another great option for buying lidocaine cream fast and conveniently. In fact, many legitimate internet pharmacies have licenses permitting them to write you prescriptions. They employ licensed doctors for this purpose and the prescriptions often are free-of-charge. Check the Board of Pharmacy’s website for your state to see whether an online pharmacy is licensed to issue medical prescriptions.  

 

Don’t trust online pharmacies that claim they can sell you Lidocaine cream without prescription, as you could be risking getting fake or adulterated drugs or become the victim of credit card or identity fraud. Always keep in mind that online pharmacies need to abide by the same U.S. regulations as any offline pharmacy.  

 

References

  1. Busato, W, and C C Galindo. “Topical Anaesthetic Use for Treating Premature Ejaculation: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study.” BJU International, vol. 93, no. 7, 2004, pp. 1018–21, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15142155https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2003.04773.x. Accessed 13 Jan. 2020.
  2. Althof, Stanley E., and Chris G. McMahon. “Contemporary Management of Disorders of Male Orgasm and Ejaculation.” Urology, vol. 93, July 2016, pp. 9–21, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090429516001898https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2016.02.018. Accessed 13 Jan. 2020.

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