Can you take Viagra if you have HIV?

What HIV is and how it relates to Viagra use

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that damages your immune system and if untreated, weakens your ability to fight everyday infections and disease.  Nowadays, HIV treatment can stop the virus spreading and if used early enough, can reverse damage to the immune system.  Such a treatment is critical to prevent the HIV virus from causing severe damage to the immune system, which leads to a number of potentially life-threatening infections and illnesses.  The name used to describe this condition is AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

 

There's currently no cure for HIV, but there are very effective drug treatments that enable most people with the virus to live a long and healthy life. 

 

With an early diagnosis and effective treatments, most people with HIV will not develop any AIDS-related illnesses and will live a near-normal lifespan.

 

Protease inhibitors (PIs) are a class of antiviral drugs that are widely used to treat HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C (a virus that can infect the liver).  These drugs can cause the inability to get or keep an erection firm enough to have sexual intercourse, known as erectile dysfunction (ED).  Besides, some people with HIV also have problems getting and keeping an erection.  This can be caused by worrying about passing the virus on during sex. 

 

Viagra is one of the most successful drugs used to treat ED.  You can take Viagra if you have HIV, but it is important that you do so responsibly and work with your doctor to make sure you’re getting the right treatment for you.  If you’re taking a protease inhibitor, your doctor will put you on a smaller dose of Viagra, because the combination of the two drugs increases the strength of Viagra. Your protease inhibitor may also slow down how quickly your liver processes sildenafil citrate, the active ingredient in Viagra.  Some patients may experience Viagra side effects that include changes in vision, dizziness, and low blood pressure. For this reason, you should not take a larger dose of Viagra than your doctor recommends.
 

References

  1. THE LANCET, Possible interaction between Sildenafil and HIV combination therapy, [website] 1999, https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(99)90041-7/fulltext, (accessed October 21, 2019).
  2. WebMD, Viagra Abuse Linked to Risky Sexual Behavior, [website] 2005, https://www.webmd.com/sexual-conditions/news/20050526/viagra-abuse-linked-to-risky-sexual-behavior, (accessed October 21, 2019).
  3. Men’s Sexual Health, Dying for a hard on? [website] 2005, http://www.wsmsh.org.uk/health/viagra/index.php, (accessed October 21, 2019).
  4. PAN, Can I take Viagra if I am on PrEP? [website] 2018, https://www.pan.org.au/blog/2018/11/26/can-i-take-viagra-if-i-am-on-prep, (accessed October 21, 2019).

Your trusted online doctor

Free shipping on all orders
Order now for delivery on Wednesday